The Johnny Winter Story

Johnny Winter concerts and tours during 2002

Johnny Winter Timeline 2002

This page covers Johnny Winter performances, concerts and tours during the year 2002, quickly jump to the year: 2000 , 2001 , 2002 , 2003 , 2004 , 2005 , 2006 , 2007 , 2008 , 2009 , 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This web-page includes many reviews of fans and visitors of Johnny Winter concerts of 1998, the opinions expressed are responsibility of the individual reviewers, the webmaster does not necessarily share these opinions,

 

Tour Dates in 2002

 

Wednesday, 30 January 2002: Internet interview with USATODAY

Johnny Winter is considered by many to be one of the greatest blues-rock artists of all time. His musical career began at the age of fourteen, when he and keyboard-playing brother Edgar formed Johnny and the Jammers in their home town of Beaumont, Texas. Since that time, Johnny crafted his own and reinterpreted others' blues standards and rock classics including B.B. King's Rock Me Baby, Chuck Berry's Johnny B. Goode and Bob Dylan's Highway 61 Revisited. His latest release, The Best of Johnny Winter, is now available on Sony/Legacy. Talk to Johnny Winter about music past and present.

Ontario, California : Johnny, who are you listening to these days? Thanks, Jimbo

Johnny Winter: I like to listen to old records I grew up with, like Muddy Waters .

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania : Hi Johnny, I am a longtime fan of yours and I am curious as to which drummer and bass player you have enjoyed playing with throughout your career? I really liked the years with Jon Paris, and Tom Compton. Thank You for your time, Leila

Johnny Winter: Tom Compton is probably my favorite.

Brooklyn, NY : Dear Johnny, Your recent live shows and recordings have all consisted entirely of blues. Don't get me wrong - I love your blues music - but I also used to enjoy hearing you play some good ol' rock and roll. Will you ever play rock music again? Thanks, Steve

Johnny Winter: I probably will do a little bit of it, but I like the blues the best.

Niagara Falls.Ont. Canada. : THANKS FOR OVER 30 YEARS OF THE THE GREATEST LIVE SHOWS AND THE MOST INCREDIBLE BLUES. I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN TOLD YOU PURCHASED YOUR 1958 FLYING V IN MONTREAL, CANADA. I KNOW YOU DO NOT PLAY IT IN CONCERT ANYMORE HOWEVER IS THAT WHERE IT WAS BOUGHT AND DO YOU STILL OWN IT? HAVE A GREAT 2002.

Johnny Winter: No, it was stolen from me, but I don't remember where it happened. I'm not sure whether I bought it in Montreal -- it was too long ago!

Minneapolis, MN : If you could change anything about your career, what would it be? Or wouldn't you change anything?

Johnny Winter: I don't think I'd change anything.

England : Have you or Edgar ever considered writing a biography of your experiences and musical career?

Johnny Winter: We've talked about it a lot, it just hasn't been the right time or the right person to do it with. I hope I do someday.

Mesa, Arizona : Thanks for so many years of cranking out the music. Your music still gets plenty of air time in this house. How is your health, and what is an average day for you? Thanks....Lyle

Johnny Winter: Average day? I watch a lot of television, practice a couple of times a week, and that's about it. And I'm feeling fine, thank you.

Carnoustie, Scotland : You have played with a lot of different musicians in various incarnations of your band. Do you ever see any of the old guys - particularly Rick Derringer - would you record or tour with Rick again? Little Foster

Johnny Winter: No, I wouldn't. I prefer playing with one guitar instead of two. And no, I don't keep in touch with Rick Derringer.

Stevensville, MD : There is something of a resurgence of slide players these days. Have you heard any that especially impress you as contributing something new and unique? What do you listen to most often when you kick back and relax?

Johnny Winter: No, I don't listen to a lot of new music, so I'm kind of behind the times on that.

Shelbyville, Indiana : Are you planning on touring again anytime sone?

Johnny Winter: Yes, I am. I'm going to do my record first, though. I'll be going into the studio in the next month.

digby nova scotia : Any chance of you recording a lightnin' hopkins song on the new album?

Johnny Winter: I don't think so, no.

St. Paul Minnesota : Do you ever play the tune "broke down engine" anymore?

Johnny Winter: No, I don't. It's an acoustic song, and I don't play acoustic songs in person.

Moncton, nb : Hi, Johnny. I was wondering if there are going to be any acoustic stuff on your upcoming pointblank release? I would love to hear some new stuff on your old nationals. Ever think about doing a newer version of your old song "Low down gal of mine"?

Johnny Winter: I probably will do an acoustic song or two on my new record, but I don't think I'll be redoing "Low Down Gal of Mine".

Sacramento, CA : How was it to work with Gregg Allman? Were you and Duane close?

Johnny Winter: I loved working with Gregg, and Duane too.

Houston,TX : Why is Beaumont, TX always named as your hometown? What happened to Leland, Mississippi? Do you remember Joe Frank Carolla?(Nominated for a Grammy years ago for "Don't Pull Your Love" while part of Hamilton, Joe Frank and Reynolds) I also believe Joe Frank drove you to school in Leland on a yellow school bus. I would venture to guess that The Delta has a larger heritage of the blues than Beaumont. Don't get me wrong, I like Beaumont, but Leland better. Let me know your thoughts! Thanks! Price Williams

Johnny Winter: I wasn't born in Leland, I was born in Beaumont, but my father was in the army at the time and my mother didn't want me to be born in Leland where there were no hopitals. And no, Joe Frank Carolla didn't drive me to school -- but I do know who he is.

Stevensville, MD : Not many people know that you headlined the historic Allman Brothers shows at the Fillmore East in '71. Was that the first time you had heard Duane's playing and was it tough following up such a killer set? (As I recall, your set was also great, by the way).

Johnny Winter: We did do the show, and I just played my normal set and didn't worry about what Duane was doing.

Delsbo, Sweden : Any plans on recording another "rock album" like Raisin Cain and the JW And-projects? I'm a blues fan and you're one of the greatest of that genre, but I also love your interpretations of Dylan, Womack etc. That mixture of slide guitar, blues licks and heavy, melodic rock is much too rare in today's music and noone did it better than you!

Johnny Winter: Not really any plans for doing that now.

halifax nova scotia : You did The Oakie Dokie Stomp in concert in the early 90's have you ever recorded that song but in the studio but never released it? keep rockin bob

Johnny Winter: No, I've never recorded it, and I have no plans to at the moment.

Carnoustie, Scotland : Johnny, I have been a fan since '71 and would just love to be able to say I had seen you play live just once before I die! You don't make it very easy though do you? Any chance of a proper British tour ... and I don't mean a Blues Festival ... I mean a TOUR? In the past you have headed off to mainland Europe nad ignored the UK - particularly Scotland! Little Foster

Johnny Winter: No plans for that right now.

Pittston Maine : I've seen you several times up here in Maine hope come again. My question is what guitar are you playing in concert now.

Johnny Winter: It's called the Laser, and I got it in Austin Texas. But I still play my Firebird guitar for slide.

 

 

Blues Revue Magazine Apr/May 2002

The April/May 2002 issue of Blues Revue kicks off with a cover feature on the three feisty blueswomen of Saffire, still Uppity after all these years. They also got an update on the career of blues-rocker Johnny Winter and a feature on legendary harpist James Cotton. And it's our annual festival issue, featuring our comprehensive list of blues events worldwide. Plus, there's all the news, columns, and album reviews you've come to expect from the world's greatest blues magazine. It's available now!

Blues Revue 2002

20th Century Guitar - April 2002

Texas Monthly - April 2002

Guitar World Acoustic April 2002

Johnny Winter 20th Century Guitar Player Magazine

 

Wednesday, 19 June 2002: B.B. King Blues Club, Manhattan

Johnny Winter 2002 BB king
   

Johnny Winter comes on stage at 8:59 P.M. Johnny has a cane and is helped on stage by two assistants. Johnny is frail and shaking. Father time has not been kind to Johnny. Gone is the brash, outrageous, growling Johnny I saw at his Fillmore East debut on February 14, 1969, with Sam & Dave. Gone is the slinky, dastardly, daring Johnny of the "Guitar Slinger" tour of 1984. Johnny Winter is very courageous in the face of obviously, extremely failing health.        The first two songs are both instrumental boogie blues. Johnny's playing is difficult and slow. But fearless Johnny will not be deterred. Song three is much stronger with lead vocals and lead guitar playing improving markedly. Now I see Johnny Winter's old guitar licks coming through again: come on Johnny, come on !!!!!!!

Song four is titled, "What Ya' Gonna

Do."
This is a strong rock & roll tune with phrasing tempo stops for dynamic effect. Johnny's current band is pictured below. From left to right they are: Johnny Winter (guitar & vocals), James Montgomery (harmonica & vocals), Wayne June (drums & vocals) and Scott Spray on bass.

The next tune is called, "Good Time Charlie." Johnny is having obvious tremors. I am distraught with concern for Johnny's health. The harmonica player, James Montgomery, takes a tasteful lead vocal on this tune. It is so unusual to see anyone else but Johnny sing lead vocals. The next number is a slow blues called, "How Lucky Can One Man Be." Gone are the super flashy extended lead runs that never seemed to end, with the growls added for effect. His leads are slow and deliberate, tasteful and well phrased, but it's just not the same Johnny. I should be very glad, he's even here to play for us at all, and for that I am extremely thankful!!! The double time tempo from the drummer drives Johnny to some inspirational blues playing for the latter part of this tune. Johnny finally gets rolling and seems to get hot. Song seven features the drummer, Wayne June, on lead vocals. He has an unusual style that is very animated. Johnny exhibits some of his best lead playing here. Now were seeing some of the old Johnny.

Another review of Johnny Winter BB King's

Another review from the ww w.bboogie.com Johnny Winter comes on stage at 8:59 P.M. Johnny has a cane and is helped on stage by two assistants. Johnny is frail and shaking. Father time has not been kind to Johnny. Gone is the brash, outrageous, growling Johnny I saw at his Fillmore East debut on February 14, 1969, with Sam & Dave. Gone is the slinky, dastardly, daring Johnny of the "Guitar Slinger" tour of 1984. Johnny Winter is very courageous in the face of obviously, extremely failing health.

The first two songs are both instrumental boogie blues. Johnny's playing is difficult and slow. But fearless Johnny will not be deterred. Song three is much stronger with lead vocals and lead guitar playing improving markedly. Now I see Johnny Winter's old guitar licks coming through again: come on Johnny, come on !!!!!!! Song four is titled, "What Ya' Gonna Do." This is a strong rock & roll tune with phrasing tempo stops for dynamic effect. Johnny's current band is pictured below. From left to right they are: Johnny Winter (guitar & vocals), James Montgomery (harmonica & vocals), Wayne June (drums & vocals) and Scott Spray on bass.

The next tune is called, "Good Time Charlie." Johnny is having obvious tremors. I am distraught with concern for Johnny's health. The harmonica player, James Montgomery, takes a tasteful lead vocal on this tune. It is so unusual to see anyone else but Johnny sing lead vocals. The next number is a slow blues called, "How Lucky Can One Man Be." Gone are the super flashy extended lead runs that never seemed to end, with the growls added for effect. His leads are slow and deliberate, tasteful and well phrased, but it's just not the same Johnny. I should be very glad, he's even here to play for us at all, and for that I am extremely thankful!!! The double time tempo from the drummer drives Johnny to some inspirational blues playing for the latter part of this tune. Johnny finally gets rolling and seems to get hot. Song seven features the drummer, Wayne June, on lead vocals. He has an unusual style that is very animated. Johnny exhibits some of his best lead playing here. Now were seeing some of the old Johnny.

 

One more review of Jphnny Winter at BB King's

Hey everybody

Went to BB Kings last night (19 Jun 2002). Great show!!!

The show was schedoled to start at 8:00. Warmup band came on at 7:30, played for 1 hour. Not bad, but not my cup of tea. The one guy was playing lots of different instruments including sitar(which was interesting), flute and some percussion instruments.

Johnny came on at 9:10 with some help and a cane. Throughout the show I could notice him shaking quite a bit. He was wearing a black hat and big beard. They went right into Hideaway, followed with Baby Don't Mean Maybe(?). Third song was Boogie Real Low. This song was where his fingers started to loosen up a bit. He did some repeating riffs and arpeggios. The next song sounded good, but I wasn't familiar with it.

The 5th song was Good Time Charlie(?) sung byJames Montgomery on Harp. This song showed what a good singer he was. Has a sort of raspy voice. Then they did Black Jack. Hot!!! JW's voice was sounding better as he went on. The 7th song was Tore Down! This was sung by the drummer, Wayne June. Not bad, but not Johnny. Next was another unfamiliar song. Then SenSaShun/Mojo Working and Mona, both sung by Montgomery. This was followed by Johnny Guitar, which was killer. A couple of times during the song , JW would play a Boney Moroney riff(much to the delight of the bikers behind me who had been calling for it all night)

His encore was Drop the bomb, done very well.

Throughout the show Johnny looked sort of stiff, sitting in a chair bent over his lazer. Didn't play any slide, but I can deal with that. I didn't hear any complaints, just lots of supportive fans who, like me, were thrilled to be there.

As the show progressed, he seemed to be pushing himself playing guitar. His leads became more and more intense. There were several times where he was really boogying. Overall, it was a great show.

Bob

 

 

Sunday, 14 July 2002 - Little Bob + Poppa Chubby + Johnny Winter Parc des Noues de Montereau (16h00)

Little Bob fait partie des mythes vivants de l'histoire du rock français 1 jour 18 Euros/2 Jours 25 Euros. The Home-Of-Rock web page has some very nice Photos of this concert.

Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002
Johnny Winter Live In Montereau Confluences (France) 14 Jul 2002

Tuesday, 16 July 2002 - Festival des Guitares - Patrimonio

Thursday, 18 July 2002 - Johnny Winter + Wishbone Ash Cooperative de Mai - Clermont Ferrand

 

Friday, 19 July 2002 - Johnny Winter Festival Voix du Gaou - Six Fours

La Coopérative de Mai, Clermont-Ferrand 18 juillet 2002

Alors que le public se masse devant la Coopérative de Mai pour voir évoluer sur scène Wishbone Ash et Johnny Winter, les Dead Plants jouent débranchés sur le parvis, à la bonne franquette. Ils sont, comme toujours, en excellente forme et font passer un bon moment de rockabilly/folk aux personnes non obnubilées par l’arrivée imminente de Wishbone Ash à l’intérieur de la salle.

Le concert de ce soir est complet, l’affiche a attiré un public de bikers pas vraiment jeunes : on se croirait au très peu regretté festival Free Wheels de Cunlhat ! C’est un véritable défilé de blousons et pantalons en cuir, de santiags, de foulards sudistes, de vestes à franges etc. De nombreuses motos sont garées bien en évidence mais deux personnes ont quand même osé venir en vélo…

Dés les premières notes, Wishbone Ash confirme tout le mal qu’on pense de sa musique : du rock F.M. progressif (sic) d’un goût plus que douteux… Une heure quinze durant, les deux guitaristes rivalisent de lourdeur et jouent à l’unisson des soli excessivement soporifiques dans la plus pure tradition de ce style musical fort heureusement en voie d’extinction. Et ce n’est pas tout ! Ils nous interprètent des chansons d’une voix qui rappelle les pires moments (et ils sont nombreux) de Toto. Les slows mielleux et ringards succèdent aux morceaux blues-rock sans aucune trace d’inspiration. Le public ne cesse d’applaudir et de les encourager à jouer encore et encore…

Après une longue attente, Johnny Winter et ses trois musiciens (basse, batterie, harmonica/chant) font leur apparition. Mister Winter est vraiment très diminué, il arrive plié en deux avec une canne et joue tout le concert assis. Le premier morceau, Hideaway, confirme l’impression visuelle : sa maladie l’empêche d’être aussi véloce qu’avant et le fait buter sur certaines notes. Un des titres interprétés ce soir s’intitule Sick and tired, il résume bien la situation !

Mais l’essentiel est là : ce monsieur a envie de jouer et de finir sa vie sur scène comme les plus grands bluesmen. Voir une telle légende du blues-rock ravit tout le monde même si ses prestations à Woodstock et dans les années 70 étaient un peu plus enflammées ! A la fin du premier morceau, Johnny pousse un « yeah » laconique...
La tonalité du concert est plutôt blues, les morceaux rapides posant visiblement problème : pas de Jumpin’ jack flash, Whole lotta shakin’ goin’ on ou Johnny be good… Mais quel bonheur d’entendre Got my mojo working, She likes to boogie real low et surtout le génial Johnny guitar malgré un chant hésitant de Johnny Winter.


Le groupe est là pour soutenir son leader et cacher les absences de la voix ou de la guitare. L’harmoniciste pousse donc souvent la chansonnette, et fait admirer son jeu d’harmonica qui mériterait un peu plus de sobriété ! Enfin, c’est pour la bonne cause… Un peu plus tard, dans le bus de tournée, il répondra souvent aux questions à la place du guitariste albinos né à Beaumont, Texas.

Le concert se termine, Johnny Winter quitte difficilement la scène : on compatit à sa douleur et on espère que c’est vraiment son choix de jouer lors des festivals européens alors qu’il se trouve dans un état pareil ! Il revient même pour un rappel où on ne peut s’empêcher de se demander si tout cela est bien raisonnable.

Le bluesman ayant joué avec Jimi Hendrix et Muddy Waters semble vouloir laisser une dernière trace (avant rétablissement ?) et enregistre en ce moment de nouveaux morceaux pour une sortie début 2003. Go, Johnny Go !!

La soirée se termine sur une note plus gaie avec les Dead Pants. Cette fois, ils jouent sur une scène et ont branché leurs instruments : rock ‘n’ roll ! La contrebasse est toujours très présente, l’harmonica joue divinement, la batterie est minimaliste laissant la guitare et le chant s’exprimer. L’effet sur le public, quant à lui, n’a pas changé : on se sent habité par une frénésie incontrôlable !

le 19/07/2002
Signature : Pierre Andrieu


Computer translation into English of above text:

Whereas the public masses in front of the Co-operative of May to see evolving/moving on scene Wishbone Ash and Johnny Winter , Dead Plants play disconnected on the square, with good the franquette. They are, like always, in excellent form and make spend a good moment of rockabilly/folk to the people not obnubilated by the imminent arrival of Wishbone Ash inside the room.

The concert of this evening is complete, the poster attracted a public of bikers not really young people: one would believe oneself in very little regretted festival Free Wheels de Cunlhat! It is a true procession of wind-breakers and leather trousers, santiags, scarves Southerners, jackets with fringes etc. Many motor bikes are parked well in obviousness but two people nevertheless dared to come en.vélo...

Dice the first notes, Wishbone Ash confirms all the evil which one thinks of his music: progressive rock'n'roll F.M. (sic) of a taste more than doubtful... One hour fifteen during, the two guitarists compete of heaviness and play in unison with the excessively soporific soli in the purest tradition of this musical style extremely fortunately in process of extinction. And it is not all! They interpret us songs of a voice which recalls the worst moments (and they are numerous) of Louse . The mielleux slow fox trots and ringards succeed the pieces blues-rock'n'roll without any trace of inspiration. The public does not cease applauding and encouraging them to still play still and...

After long waiting, Johnny Winter and its three musicians (low, battery, harmonica/chant) make their appearance. Mister Winter really is very decreased, it arrives folded into two with a cane and plays all the sitted concert. The first piece, Hideaway , confirm the visual impression: its disease prevents it from being as swift as before and the fact of butting against certain notes. One of the interpreted titles this evening is entitled Sick and tired , it summarizes the situation well!

But essence is there: this Mister wants to play and finish his life on scene like largest bluesmen. See such a legend of the blues-rock'n'roll ravit everyone even if its services with Woodstock and in the Seventies were ignited a little! At the end of the first piece, Johnny pushes a laconic "yeah "...

The tonality in the concert is rather blues, the fast pieces posing problem obviously: no Jumpin' jack flash , Whole lotta shakin' goin' one or Johnny Be good ... But which happiness to hear Got my mojo working , She likes to boogy real low and especially brilliant Johnny guitar in spite of a song hesitating of Johnny Winter .

The group is there to support its leader and to hide the absences of the voice or the guitar. The harmonicist thus pushes often the ditty, and makes admire his play of harmonica which would deserve a little more sobriety! Lastly, it is for the good cause... A little later, in the bus of round, it will often answer the questions in the place of the albino guitarist born in Beaumont, Texas.

The concert finishes, Johnny Winter leaves the scene with difficulty: one sympathizes with his pain and one hopes that it is really its choice to play at the time of the European festivals whereas it is in a similar state! It returns even for a recall where one cannot prevent oneself from wondering whether all that is quite reasonable.

The bluesman having played with Jimi Hendrix and Muddy Waters seems to want to leave a last trace (before re-establishment?) and records in this moment of new pieces for an exit at the beginning of 2003. Go, Johnny Go!!

The evening finishes on a merrier note with Dead Pants . This time, they play on a scene and connected their instruments: rock'n'roll ' roll! The double bass is always very present, the harmonica plays divinement, the battery is minimalist leaving the guitar and the song to be expressed. The effect on the public, as for him, did not change: one feels inhabited by an unverifiable frenzy!

Saturday, 20 July 2002 - Festive de Font Robert

Monday, 22 July 2002 - Theatre de la Mer - Sete

Ce soir le théâtre de la mer est plein à craquer, Johnny Winter joue. Mais d'abord il y a l'obstacle Wishbone Ash... Wishbone Ash c'est du "rock progressif ancien", un clash dans l'espace temps. Du coup la musique est inspide, vide, sans aucun intér^et. Pourtant les gens en redemande. Merde. On fait passer le temps comme on peut et puis vient le moment. Les roadies se chargent de préparer la scène. Une chaise rouge pour Johnny Winter, avec deux amplis fender (à gauche), une belle batterie pearl (derrière), et deux gros SW pour le bassiste (à droite), enfin, un petit fender(?) pour l'harmoniciste (au milieu). La foule cri son nom et Johnny Winter arrive sur scène...porté par 3 roadies. Tout le monde reste bouche bée, interloqué, éberlué. Qu'est ce qu'est devenu notre bluesman ? Est-ce Jean-Paul II qui arrive ici sur scène ou Johnny Winter complètement décati ? Sa jambe droite ne cesse de trembler (parkinson ?), il est courbé, plié en deux. Il porte la barbe et son habituel gros chapeau qui voile la moitié de son regard (que l'on devine cependant hagard). Le voilà qui se lance dans la première chanson (impossible de me souvenir de la playlist mais en gros c'est très proche de NYC97 : sen-sha-sun / mojo / johnny guitar / une allusion a Fast life rider / black cat / she's like the boogie etc...). Le son est bon, mais le physique de notre ami ne lui permet plus ni de tenir le rythme ni de ne pas se louper sur certains plans (Il chante une chanson sur deux, l'harmoniciste ou le batteur reprennant le chant pour le laisser respirer). Mais ce n'est pas grave finalement car c'est bien un authentique héros qui est là, à s'arracher pour jouer sa musique. Je voulais du blues, j'en ai eu Johnny Winter pouvait mourir sur scène ce soir que cela ne m'aurait pas surpris. Un seul regret le numéro de cirque avec le passage obligé par un morceau de slide.
Pablo Pernot

Computer translation: This evening the theatre of the sea is full to crack, Johnny Winter plays. But initially there is the obstacle Wishbone Ash... Wishbone Ash it is "old progressive rock'n'roll", a clash in space time. Blow the music is inspide, empty, without any intér^et. However people in redemande. Shit. One makes spend time as one can and then comes the moment. The roadies are given the responsability to prepare the scene. A red chair for Johnny Winter, with two amplifiers fender (on the left), a beautiful battery pearl (behind), and two large SW for the bass player (on the right), finally, small a fender(?) for the harmonicist (in the medium). Crowd cry her name and Johnny Winter arrives on scene... carried by 3 roadies. Everyone remains bée mouth, disconcerted, flabbergasted. What became our bluesman? Is this Jean-Paul II who arrives here on scene or Johnny Winter completely steamed? Its right leg does not cease trembling (Parkinson?), it is curved, folded into two. It wears the beard and its usual large hat which veils half of its glance (that one guesses however hagard). Here are which launches out in the first song (impossible to remember me the playlist but approximately it is very close to NYC97: SEN-sha-sun/mojo/johnny guitar/an allusion has Fast life to wrinkle/black cat/she' S like the boogy etc...). The sound is good, but the physique of our friend enables him any more neither to hold the rate/rhythm nor of not louper on certain plans (It sings a song on two, the harmonicist or the beater reprennant the song to let it breathe). But it is not serious finally because it is well an authentic hero who is there, to tear off itself to play its music. I wanted blues, I had Johnny Winter of it could die on scene this evening that that would not have me surprised. Only one regret the number of circus with the passage obliged by a piece of slide. Pablo Pernot

Blues Feelings Sep 2002 (France)

Blues Feelings 2002

 

Wednesday, 18 September 2002 - Harpers Ferry, Allston MA

Friday, 20 September 2002 - Club Liquid, Leominster, MA

Saturday, 21 September 2002 - Pearl Street, North Hampton, MA

Friday, 4 October 2002- The Stadium Theater, Woonsocket

Saturday, 5 October 2002 - The Julian Studley Theater, SUNY/New Paltz

Wednesday, 30 October 2002 - Luther's Blues Madison, WI

Review and Photos by Tony Bonyata

When Texas blues guitar slinger Johnny Winter tottered out onto the stage last Wednesday evening with cane in hand, only to be assisted to a seat in the front of the stage (where he remained for the duration of his thirteen song set) it may have, at first, appeared as though his days of laying down his own brand of white hot blues might soon be numbered. But with his still-nimble fingers, soulful heart and a taut, sinewy backing band, this 58-year old blues-rocker still showed, like so many other elderly blues greats before him, that he's still got his mojo working overtime.

Winter first began his career in the late '60s working with The Progressive Blues Experiment before branching out on his own with his debut Texas-spiced blues album Johnny Winter. The singer/ guitarist gained more commercial success throughout the '70s when he released albums with more of a rock 'n' roll kick to them, such as Still Alive and Well, Saints and Sinners and the two stunning live collections Johnny Winter And, and Captured Live. Then in 1977 Winter produced and performed on Muddy Waters' Grammy Award winning comeback album Hard Again, as well as using the talents of Waters on his own back-to-basics album Nothin' But The Blues. And while his rock 'n' roll sensibilities have never really left him, it was the soulful mourn of the blues that Johnny has predominately stuck to ever since. So it was no surprise when the seated Winter, with long white pony-tail, grizzled white beard and a sleeveless black t-shirt exposing his rail-thin arms decorated in faded tattoos, tore through a rousing set of scorching blues numbers guaranteed to raise the roof off any juke joint. Although Winter's voice lacked the raw, guttural punch of his youth, his guitar-work, which still showcased a few blinding solos, more than made up for it. Despite having surgery on his hip last year (resulting from a bad fall) which he's still, apparently, slowly recovering from, as well as taking medication to combat his anxiety attacks, Winter, nonetheless, did what he does best, and that's play some damn fine guitar.

But even more than the frontman's own musical prowess, it was his choice of well-seasoned bandmembers - James Montgomery (harp/ vocals), Scott Spray (bass) and Wayne June (drums) - that really stoked the flames of this fiery performance. From Montgomery's smoking-gun harp solos, animated stage antics and ballsy vocals on a few numbers, including a rousing cover of Bo Diddley's "Mona," to the tighter-than-a-gnat's-ass-stretched-over-a-pickle-barrel rhythm section of Spray and June, Winter could've been in a coma and the house still would've come down around them. Despite the fact that his guitar sounded strangely out of step on a cover of Waters' "Got My Mojo Working," Winter thankfully, however, wasn't in a deep sleep as he proved on the slower tempo blues of "Black Cat," the rollicking "Lone Wolf" (a new song from his forthcoming studio album due in the spring of 2003), as well as a cover of Freddie King's "Sen-sa-shun," where his devilish leads snaked throughout. The highlight of the evening was saved for last, when the guitarist traded in his Laser guitar for his prized Gibson Firebird on a harrowing version of J.B. Lenoir's "Mojo Boogie,"where he dished out a menacing slide guitar that left the packed house famished for more. Opening for Winter was the 78-year old Mississippi bluesman T-Model Ford. With nothing more than a drummer and his electric guitar, Ford, clad in a flannel shirt, beat-up baseball cap and warm smile, held sway with his audience with his own brand of rough hewed Delta blues and dusty, hypnotic rhythms performed on his guitar.

Guitar Player November 2002

Guitar Player November 2003, re-issue interview with Johnny Winter and Muddy Waters from August 1983. In memory of Muddy Waters with Johnny Winter. Cover page pictures Johnny with a Gibson Les Paul and Muddy holding his good ol' red Telecaster. A very nice issue of Guitar Player, the interview of Johnny Winter and Muddy Waters was released in Guitar Player 2002.

Johnny Winter and Muddy Waters in Guitar Player Magazine

 

Johnny Winter and Muddy Waters

 

Bands of Dixie - Nov/Dec 2002 (France)

Interview with Johnny Winter just before the concert of 18 Jul 2002 in Clermont Ferrand (France), scans by Luc Brenot

Johnny Winter Interview in France Clermont Ferrand 2002
Johnny Winter Clermont Ferrand France 2002   Johnny Winter Clermont Ferrand France 2002  
Johnny Winter Clermont Ferrand France 2002  
Johnny Winter Interview in France Clermont Ferrand 2002  

Nov 2002: Johnny Winter still enthused at 58

By MICHAEL ZITZ

The Free Lance-Star THE FREE LANCE-STAR

Blues rock legend Johnny Winter has been playing professionally for over four decades now-- since he was 15 years old--but his enthusiasm for the road is as keen as ever at age 58.

"I just love it," Winter said Sunday in a telephone interview from a tour stop in Connecticut. "I love to play. Lucky I get paid for it, because I'd probably do it for nothing if I had to."

Winters tours one month, takes one month off, then goes back out again.

When he's home, he says he spends most of his time watching television.

"I like 'The Simpsons' a lot," he said. "I watch Nick at Nite, Archie Bunker, "Leave it to Beaver,"--all the comedy shows."

In 1959, Johnny Winter began playing with his saxophone and keyboard playing brother Edgar Winter. But the Beaumont, Texas, native didn't become a national figure until Rolling Stone featured him in 1968 and he signed with Columbia Records.

Johnny Winter's blazing slide guitar, combined with the fact that he is an albino, made him highly recognizable in the '70s and '80s. Winter, who plays the State Theatre in Falls Church Saturday night, credits blues great B.B. King with helping him get started.

He said King let him sit in with his band after Winter "bugged" him obnoxiously."

Winter said that in 1961, when he was 17, he and Edgar came to a King show. An albino dressed in a trench coat, Winter must have been a strange sight.

"He didn't want to let me play at all. At first he thought I was from the IRS," Winter laughed. "He thought the IRS was coming to get him because white folks didn't come to his shows then and because we were wearing trench coats. He thought we were coming after him about his taxes."

Winter said the big difference between his early days and today is that in the beginning, there were very few white blues fans.

"It was hard just finding people who wanted to hear the blues," he said.

He credited Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughn with engaging white audiences, but many say Winter himself played a major role.

He has mixed rock songs such as "Rock and Roll Hoochie Koo" with blues fare like "Rollin' and Tumblin'" to remain relevant.

Winter, who produced and played on several Muddy Waters albums, is credited with helping Waters receive the mainstream attention he so richly deserved.

Winter himself was inducted into the Blues Foundation's Hall of Fame in 1986.

NOVEMBER 2002

 

PLAYER (Young Mates Music) 11 2002

Johnny Winter reference on magazine front cover and a two page article called: "The Retrorock 'n Archive" in Japanese) by Steven Rosen

 

Friday, 1 November 2002 - House of Blues, Chicago, IL

Saturday, 2 November 2002 - The Royal Oak Theater/Magic Bag, Royal Oak, MI

Photo Gallery from the Royal Oak Theatre

Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002
Johnny Winter Royal Oak Theatre Nov 2002

Friday, 22 November 2002 - Baltimore Thunderdome

 

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