The Johnny Winter Story

Johnny Winter timeline in 1973

 

Johnny Winter Timeline 1973

In 1973 Johnny Winter continues to recover from a heroine addiction and comes back with the album "Still Alive and Well". During the promotion of this album at the "Still Alive and Well Tour", Doug Brockie is second guitarist.

The "Still Alive and Well album scores #22 in the US Charts on 13 March 1973 In the first half of 1973 Johnny Winter tours extensively together with Foghat (during April, May and June of 1973)

Johnny switches from Fender guitars to the Gibson Firebird from which he removes the tremolo and changed the tailpiece

 This page covers Johnny Winter in 1973, use the links below to quickly jump to the year: 1970 , 1971 , 1972 , 1973 , 1974 , 1975 , 1976 , 1977 , 1978 , 1979 .

 

Johnny Winter's career highlights in 1973 Month by Month

Johnny Winter positions in the Billboard Charts during 1973

 

 

Wednesday, 7 March 1973 - Capital Center, Washington DC

Los Angeles, Hollywood Palladium, a recording of this concert is available as "Live 1973 Hollywoord Palladium"

    Setlist:
  1. Rock me baby
  2. Can't you feel it
  3. Rock'n'roll hoochie koo
  4. Black cat bone
  5. Rock & roll [12+ minutes version, with slide guitar jam]
  6. Too much seconal
  7. Jumpin' jack flash
  8. Johnny B. Goode
  9. Crossroads
  10. Talk to your daughter [with a saxophone solo! By the second guitarist???]
  11. Roll over Beethoven

 

07 Mar 1973 - Capital Center, Washington DC

Paris, France Le Palais Des Sports

 

Johnny Winter Live Paris Le Palais Des Sports, France 1973

5 April 1973 New York Times

Review of the album "Still Alive and Well"

Cash Box, 31 Mar 1973

Review of "Still Alive and Well" in the German Pop magazine: Cash Box

Johnny Winter Still Alive and Well Reviewed in Cashbox 31 March 1973

STILL ALIVE AND WELL-Johnny Winter-Columbia KC 32188 Johnny's first LP in two years is basically a trio effort as he's assisted by Randy Jo Hobbs an bass and the drums of Richard Hughes.

 

Rick Derringer, who also produced, guests an three tracks (slide, pedal steel and electric); cameos also from Todd Rundgren's mellotron and Jeremy Steig's flute.

The affinity that the Texas-born guitar/vocalist has for Jagger & Richards material starts and ends side two with "Silver Train" and a strong rendering of "Let lt Bleed" respectively. The countrified "Ain't Nothing To Me" is also impressive. He's still in the forefront of bluesrock-and for good reason.

 

Tuesday, 3 April 1973 - Palace Theatre, Waterbury (not Westbury)

Johnny Winter at the Palace Theatre in 1973 has been released on a bootleg CD. This Bootleg Contains Two Additional Songs From 1975 Palace Theatre: Sweet Papa John, Pick Up On My Mojo

 

  Johnny Winter at the Palace Theatre in 1973

  Johnny Winter at the Palace Theatre in 1973

  Johnny Winter at the Palace Theatre in 1973   Johnny Winter at the Palace Theatre in 1973
    Setlist:
  1. Rock Me Baby
  2. Intro Of Susan Warford
  3. The Good Love
  4. Aint Nothing To Me
  5. Rock &Amp; Roll Hoochie Koo,
  6. Too Much Seconal
  7. Rock &Amp; Roll
  8. Jumpin Jack Flash
  9. Johnny Be. Goode
  10. Silver Train

 

Johnny Winter Portrait around 1973

 

 

 

20 April 1973 Palace Theater, Waterbury Johnny Winter

Tuesday, 24/25 April 1973 - Maple Leaf Gardens, Toronto, Canada

This concerts has been released on the bootleg: Alive and Well in Toronto

  1. Rock me baby
  2. Can't you feel it
  3. Rock'n'roll hoochie koo
  4. Black cat bone
  5. Rock'n'roll
  6. Jumpin' jack flash
  7. Johnny B. Goode
  8. Rollin' & tumblin'
  9. Roll over beethoven
  10. Let it bleed

Johnny Winter did record gate business at Maple Leaf Gardens which grossed $92,000 from an attendance of 16,000 - only acts ever to top that figure at the gardens are the Beatles and the Rolling Stones

Tuesday, 24/25 April 1973 - Maple Leaf Gardens, Toronto, Canada 

Thursday, 26 April 1973 - Cobo Hall, Detroit

Saturday, 28 April 1973 - Coliseum, Ft Wayne

Sunday, 29 April 1973 - Convention Center, Louisville

 

 

Tuesday, 1 May 1973 - Amphitheater, Chicago.

Thursday, 3 May 1973 - Boston

Friday, 4 May 1973 - Spectrum, Philadelphia : Johnny Winter, Poco, Foghat

Saturday, 5 May 1973 - Montreal Forum

Johnny Winter at the Montreal Forum with King Crimson (Fripp, Wetton, Bruford, and Cross) as supporting act. Johnny Winter's band had two drummers and a female singer (Susan?)

With special guest: Rick Derringer and Rocky Hill

    Setlist:
  1. Rock me baby
  2. Can't you feel it
  3. Rock'n'roll hoochie koo [with Rick Derringer]
  4. Great balls of fire [with Rick Derringer. Very similar rendition to the one on the "And Live" official release;
  5. Black cat bone
  6. Jumpin' jack flash
  7. Let it bleed
  8. Everyday I have the blues [with Rocky Hill on guitar]
  9. Back door friend [with Rocky Hill on guitar]

 

Thursday, 10 May 1973: Cumberland County Coliseum, Fayetteville

Review of Johnny Winter's Cumberland Concert by Lee Hamilton

FAYETTEVILLE — Thursday night was a "school night," but that didn't deter a crowd of over 4,500 fans from being on hand for rock star Johnny Winter at the Cumberland Memorial Arena here. ' As a matter of fact, it was about as enthusiastic a togetherness as we've seen in quite some time for a rock concert nf anv kind.It was "good vibes" all the way from the outset as a group known as the "Peace Core" got things under way at 7:30 p.m., and the yells and shrieks continued through "Fog's" performance, but that was nothing to the reception that Johnny Winter received when his set got started after the intermission.

Winter, a platinum blonde of very longish hairstyle, whooped and camped unmercifully through his final haif of the concert to the almost raving ovation of the fans; but we cannot say that his music or his on-stage performance was anything out of the ordinary for a hard-rock show of this sort. . Apparently, Winter is enjoying some sort of success that we would consider incredible in view of the much more spectacular competition he has from such groups as "Alice Cooper" and — even his brother, Edgar Winter, who played the arena earlier this season.

Edgar, of course, is the champion of high camp with his outre outfit, his golden bangles and beads, and his devil-maycare GAY attitude, but Johnny is trying hard, and may yet usurp his brother's obvious popularity. By and large, the crowd really took to Winter's enthusiasm and musical interpretations; but, it would seem that there was more audience rapport with the two previous .back-up entertaining groups. Rock-wise, Winter wias in top form, and came through with many of his tunes from various albums — past and present — that have been released nationwide.

Somehow, though, we didn't get the message that the fans were as "in" with his statement that they should have been under the circumstances. Of course, a rather large percentage of the crowd seemed to be zonked-out on something other than the sounds, and, as a result, were rather hard put to show enthusiasm for anything other than being able to keep themselves upright most of the time. One fact was clear, however, that being that everyone was having a ball, and, we suppose, that's what counts most. This was a sit-down-on-thefloor or stand-up-as-you-will type of concert, and most of the audience was either "on the floor" or wandering around, as it fit their temperament of the moment.

Naturally, it was absolutely impossible to get any closer to the stage than 50 feet (unless one arrived mighty early), but one really didn't need to be too close up to hear, for the amps were open to full volume. Peering through the gloom of haze, smoke, that is, ione could perceive just about all manner of exuberation from the youthful audience. There was certainly an atmosphere of "togetherness" exhibited among the 4,000- plus gathered for the happening. All-in-all, we would, say that the Winter experience ;was a real success, at least as far as the promoters were concerned; and it should be interesting to note just how the "generation gap" will be bridged when Glen Campbell appears at the arena in June.

What do you want to bet? That seems to be it for this week, at least as far as SIGHTS is concerned, so do get it together, and tally -ho!

Friday 11 May 1973: West Palm Beach Auditorium, West Palm Beach

Saturday 12 May 1973: Pirates World, Dania, Florida

Sunday, 13 May 1973: Curtis Hixon Hall, Tampa, Florida

A preview of this concert at Hixon

Winter at Hixon

Give your mother a really different present this Mother's Day , take her to the Johnny Winter concert. Winter will be at Curtis Hixon Sunday night along with English rock group "Foghat." Johnny's brother Edgar has been to the Tampa Bay area several times in the past couple of years. but this is the first time in quite a while for Johnny. When Johnny and Edgar were still in high school, they formed two bands together. First, was "It and Them" and then "Johnny Winter and the Black Plague." Since high school the two have come long ways, together and separately. Johnny doesn't need anything but his own name to attract crowds to his gutty rock and roll style now.

During his one semester at Lamar Technical College, as a business major, Johnny spent most of his time in Louisiana to play small clubs on the weekends. Eventually he went to Chicago where he ran into the likes of Mike Bloomfield, played a while, and then went back to Texas. Rolling Stone, in 1968, published an in-depth study of Texas music and Johnny was brought to national attention. In the article Larry Sepulvada described Winter as "a hundred-and-thirty point cross-eyed albino with long fleecy hair, playing some of the gutsiest, fluid blues guitar you ever heard." He still does, with a little good old rock and roll thrown in. Leading off Sunday's show will be "Foghat:"

Roger Earl (drums), Tony Stevens (bass) and Dave Peverett (guitar and vocals) who formed the group when they left Savoy Brown. The other member is Rod Price who plays lead and slide guitars. The group's single release you probably are most familiar with was "I Just Want to Make Love to You." Showtime is 7:90: Tickets are $5.50 in advance or $6 at the door and are on sale at Rasputin's and Liberation Music in Tampa, Stereo Tape, Bellas Hess in Clearwater,

The review of this concert at Curtis Hixon Hall

Johnny Winter Triumphs at Tampa Party

By BOB ROSS

Johnny Winter, the genuine freak of rock 'n mil, returned In triumph this weekend to Florida, and his audiences, Including a near-capacity crowd at Curtis Hixon Hall, welcomed him back with roars of enthusiasm. Winter's meteoric rush to fame was apparently too much of a good thing for him to handle — or so the story goes. He shot out of Texas with a mean blues guitar, was hyped into almost immediate stardom, and then the realities of it all reportedly prescured him into a mini retirement. Anyway, after at least a year's sabbatical, Johnny Winter is back — and he's definitely In good shape. The crowd at Curtis Hixon Sunday night was in a splendid mood to welcome Johnny.

The first band to play, Foghat, was perfect for the warm-up spot, and warm 'em up they did. It was hard to believe this was the same Foghat that had played such a lukewarm set at the Zappa show a couple of months ago. Not only was the band tighter and livelier, but the audience was much more its type. It was obvious this was a night to Rock and Roll. YOU HAVE to hear Johnny Winter say the words "Rock and Roll" to appreciate his approach. Imagine a tall, gangly guy with white-white long straight hair, white and silver clothes, and a face that compares favorably with an imaginary cross-eyed goofy albino chipmunk. Most definitely one-of-a-kind.

And that voice ... gravelly growls and guttural howls .. and a lot of the blues. Musically, the formula Is the same but the personnel are better than ever. Always basically Into a power trio combination, Winter has it down solidly this time around. His bass player is perfect for the counterparts to Johnny's screaming guitar breaks. JOHNNY'S SET was short but very powerful. He played mostly tunes that were familiar, and the atmosphere was "party" all the way. He even said to the fans at one point: "We don't play no concerts, man . . . we play parties?' So the party included such Winter favorites as "Rock and Roll Hoochie Coo," "Jumpin' Jack Flash," "Johnny B. Goode," "Honky-Tonk Women," and two dynamite encores — "Roll Over Beethoven" and "Long Tall Sally." Winter just gets up on stage and lays It out — high-power rock and roll guitar-playing at Its most soul-stirring level. His vocals are impressive, but it's that guitar that makes him more than just another crazy-looking pretty face on the circuit.

    Setlist:
  1. Rock me baby
  2. Can't you feel it
  3. Rock and roll, hoochie koo
  4. Black cat bone
  5. Rock & roll [great version, Randy Hobbs shines]
  6. Jumpin' jack flash
  7. Johnny B. Goode
  8. Honky tonk women [rare]
  9. Roll over beethoven
  10. Long tall sally

Thursday 17 May 1973: Fox Theater, Atlanta: Johnny Winter, Foghat, Jo Jo Gunne

 

Friday 18 May 1973: Rickwoodd Field, Birmingham, Alabama

Opening act: Brownsville Station, followed by Foghat, followed by Johnny Winter

 

Saturday 19 May 1973: Hofheinz Pavilion, Houston

Johnny Winter at the Hofheinz Pavillon, Houston with special guest Foghat. The poster announcing this concert

JWS Saturday 19 May 1973: Hofheinz Pavilion, Houston
 

Thursday 23 May 1973: Memorial Auditorium Sacramento

Friday, 25 May 1973: Hollywood Palladium, Los Angeles

Foghat opened the show for Johnny Winter. It seems that Johnny was using two drummers during this concert

Johnny Winter at the Hollywood Palladium 1973

Johnny Winter at the Hollywood Palladium 1973

 

 

Sat-Sunday, 26-27 May 1973: Winterland

The two-year comeback of Johnny Winter took place at Winterland this past weekend. He was better than ever. He was featured out in front of his band playing good Rock n' roll that has not been around for a while. His singing and guitar pickingwentalonggood together as he did many songs from his "Still Alive and Well" LP, along with''things like "Jumping Jack Flash" and "Rock 'n Roll Hoochie Coo". Foghat added greatly to the bill, except for the vocals by Lonesome Dave. . .

Johnny Winter, Foghat, Frampton's Camel at Winterland

 

Johnny Winter, Foghat, Led Zeppeing, Egales, Focus

Monday, 28 May 1973: Hollywood Palladium, Los Angeles : Johnny Winter , Fog Hat

A review of the Hollywood Palladium concert

AT THE PALLADIUM

Fast-Fret Fireworks From Johnny Winter

The "rock audience's passion for the electric guitar as the star of the show has pretty much dwindled, but all the excitement and magic that surrounded Becks, Clapton, Hendrix et al in those glory days was conlured by Johnny Winter at this Monday night Palladium concert.The fierceness and power of his playing and the inescapable charisma of 'his presence (a quality that even some unconvincing movements couldn't efface) were the twin compbnents of the incredibly fast-moving, uncomplicated display of rock 'n' roll fireworks, a show in which visual and musical flash coexisted beautifully with intense and skilled musicianship.

Johnny Winter seemed to be sucking the music from the guitar with his fingers, generally at a pace so torrid that you were almost seeing smoke and inevitably imagining something like an athlete running a 9-second 100-yard dash on a tightrope.While Johnny Winter's singing is negligible, that guitar of his flawlessly communicates the basic energy of rock 'n' roll and unflinch- ingly creates an invigoratlng, piledriving emotional thrust. That's at least as important and valuable as 'being an innovator.The blues is always at the heart of his music, but he has sense enough not to dwell on hackneyed patterns, instead t e a ri n g through closely allied spinoffs ("Rock and Roll Hootchie Coo") and distant relatives ("Jumpin' Jack Flas ").

At every point in the set the surge was upward, his band was superb, the sparkle of the costumlng added to the s p e c t a c l e rather than diverting one's attention, and Winter's regal, pale appearance eventually became close to noble. Johnny Winter is definitely alive and extremely well, a condition for which-we-should be very grateful;Second-billed Foghat is a rising British blues band, a genre that has some built-in limitations. But it's already one of the best players of the game, and its set was never less than at least interesting.

-RICHARD CROMELIN

 

Wednesdy, 30 May 1973: Coliseum, Denver

Johnny Winter in June 1973

6 June 1973 - Memphis

14 June 1973 - Hampton Coliseum in Hampton, Va, Johnny Winter with Foghat

Friday 15 June 1973 Merriweather Post Pavillion, Columbia

Saturday, 16 June 1973 - Madison Square Garden, New York City

Supporting act: FogHat

A review from this concert at the Madison Square Garden (Source Unknown)

Alive and welL still working at high temperature., YES, FOLKS, Johnny Winter is still alive and well, and he proved his recuperative abilities by selling out Madison Square Garden and thoroughly galvanising the crowd — despite the fact that while people kept yelling for "rock and roll" Winter just kept on laying down his own brand of bluesy rock (which to me is nearer rock than blues anyway).

 

Bearsville recording artists Foghat were the opening act, and they got off a truly flash variation of British hot rocks. They seem to be just what New Yorkers expect a British act to be — with silver suits, striped and checkered satin, endless energy output et al. Foghat's music roared outlandishly, stimulating the kids in the front rows to rise en masse, and trip the light fantastic. The band have been building a following here, so several of their numbers were known — particularly "She's Gone," from their second album, and "Leaving Again", from their first.

During the set-up for Winter, Focus's "Hocus Pocus" was played, while promoter Howard Stein implored the kids to stay in their places and get out of the stage area. It had all the makings of another Altamount, but, thank God, didn't get out of hand. Winter won over the crowd immediately when he swept onto the stage in the same black velvet gown with shocking pink satin sleeves that he wore when he sat in at Max's Kansas City with Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys, and went "Nashville".

But there was nothing Country about his music, no sirree. "Still Alive And Well," Johnny's fifth Columbia album, does' contain one ripping L.A.-Country-type song, "Ain't Nothing To Me," written by The Coasters in 1963. But whereas on the album Rick Derringer played pedal steel and slide guitar, there wasn't anything resembling a pedal steel on the Garden stage. They opened with Bill Broonzy and Arthur Crudup's "Rock Me Baby," from the new album, and a shower of silver squares cascaded down from the Garden ceiling — just like Alice Cooper's funny money did.

Sashaying across the stage with the lights turning his hair bright gold and his black gown fluttering, Winter looked like a witch riding a magic guitar. And with him was this Female beating on a tambourine with a stick — and she wore this fantastic silver jumpsuit which plunged to the navel — and lower — with multi-fringe, like a bopping neon cheerleader. Johnny capered up the scales of his guitar as though he had the mid-night creep.

He stripped cutely- out of his gown down to the same kind of jump-suit as the tambourine lady. bumping and grinding with pur-pose as he did so, to delighted applause. Johnny's own "Rock And Roll", also from the new LP. followed, and then "Rock And Roll Hoochie Koo", written by Derringer (who was not on the Garden gig). He twirled his fringe like an exotic dancer, extricating his guitar strap, and working the stage. You could call him a perfectionist, but even the search for perfection has its limits. He changed his guitar in just about every song, and once, he even did it in the middle of a number.

Someone in the audience threw something which hit him, and he stopped, mid-song, to lecture them: "Next time someone hits me on the head. that's the end of the show!" He wasn't hurt, but he sure made an issue out of the action. (When you think about Alice the Coop getting beaned by that tequila bottle and still carrying out his act — even with what turned out to be a minor concussion, you have to give credit where it's due. Alice is a trouper, whereas perhaps John-ny Winter has become more of an institution than a performer).

Every other word out of his mouth was "Rock and roll!", from his lyrics to his one-liners or more extended raps. Still, although he pretended to go along with the great Boogie Rock mystique, Johnny's music was not so much rock as the song titles suggested. His guitar style has lost none of its forcefulness, and my ears crackled from the decibel level. He played opposite his bass player, Randy Jo Hobbs once of the McCoys, and also a member of the Johnny Winter And band. The long, exaggerated solos were self-indulgent. although technically clean and gilt-edged.

Imagine B. B. King at speed, dressed up like a witch doing a strip act, and you've got the picture. "Jumpin' Jack Flash" finally brought things round to rock. and it was about time. The folks wanted another chance to leap up and release their energy, and they seem to get to it no matter who performs this great rock classic. Johnny had 'em going and reached for more, thrusting the head of his guitar between the legs of the tambourine-play-ing Sex Object. There was no way he could escape without doing several encores, and the smell of sulp-phur dioxide swept the mammoth hall as cmatches were ignited as a love offering.

Kids on the balconies beseiged the lower areas with roman candles and other quick-ie flame-like devices, and the rent-a-cops started hustling and hassling. After some deliberation (which was probably faked, since Johnny seemed be have calculated nearly every move). they chose Chuck Berry's "Johnny B. Goode", with all the stops pulled out. This in-spired contributions on the cho-rus of "Go, Johnny, Go!" from the madding throng. I'll still take Chuck Berry do-ing Chuck Berry. He threw in some bravura guitar playing, on his-knees on the floor, and then the ultimate over-head, behind-back; every possible angle.

Visions of Hendrix were un-avoidable. but Hendrix copped the idea from T-Bone Walker, who originated the practise of grinding the guitar suggestively between his legs or playing be-hind his back in the '40's. All this brought raucous brayings for more, but I cut out before the last encore.

    Setlist:
  1. Rock me baby
  2. Can't you feel it
  3. Rock and roll, hoochie koo
  4. Black cat bone
  5. Black cat bone [complete version]
  6. Rock & roll [superb rendition, almost 15 minutes]
  7. Jumpin' jack flash
  8. Johnny B. Goode [first encore; 8 minutes plus]
  9. Crossroads [second encore]
Johnny Winter Madison Square Garden 1973

Review: (Author unknown)

Alive and well, but still working at high temperature. Yes, folks, Johnny Winter is still alive and well, and he proved his recuparetive abilities by selling out Madison Square Garden and thoroughly galvanised the crowd, despite the fact that while people kept yelling "rock and roll", Winter just kept on laying down his own brand of bluesy rock. Foghat were the opening act, and they got off a truly flash variation of British hot rocks.

 

 

Johnny Winter Madison Square Garden 1973

Winter won over the crowd immediately when he swept onto the stage in the same black velvet gown with shocking pink sleeves that he wore when he sat in at Max's Kansas City with Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys, and went "Nashville".

But there was nothing Country about his music, no sirree. They opened with Bill Broonzy and Arthur Cruduo's "Rock me baby", from the new (Still Alive and Well) album, and a shower of silver squares cascaded down from the Garden ceiling - just like Alice Cooper's funny money did. Sashaying across the stage with the lights turning his hair bright gold and his black gown fluttering, Winter looked like a witch riding a magic guitar.


 

Johnny Winter Madison Square Garden 1973

And with him was this Female beatting on a tambourine with a stick - and she wore this fantastic silver jumpsuit which plunged to the navel - and lower - with multi-fringe, like a bopping neon cheerleader. Johnny capered up the scales of his guitar as though he had the mid-night creep. He stripped cutely out his fown down to the same kind of junpsuit as the tambourine lady, bumping and grinding with purpose as he did so, to delighted applause.


He twirled his fringe like and exotic dancer, extricating his guitar strap and working the stage. You could call him a perfectionist, but even his search for perfection has its limits. He changed his guitar in about just every song, and once, he even did it in the middle of a number.

Every word out of his mouth was "rock and roll" from his lyrics to his one-liners or more extended raps. Still although the pretended to go along with the great boogie rock mystique, Johnny's music was not so much rock as the songtitles suggested. His guitar style has lost none of its forcefulness, and my ears crackled from the decibel level.

 

Johnny Winter Madison Square Garden 1973

He played opposite his bass player Randy Jo Hobss, once of the McCoys and alsa a member of the Johnny Winter And band. The long exaggerated solos were self-indulgent, altough technically clean and gilt-edged. Image BB King at speed, dressed up like a witch doing a strip act, and you've got the picture.

"Jumping Jack Flash" finally brought things to rock and it was about time. The folks wanteda another chance to leap up and release tehri energy, and they seem to get to it no matter who performs this great rock classic. Johnny ahd'em going and reached for more, thrusting the head of his guitar between the legs of the tambourine playing sex-object. There was no way he could escape without doing several encores, and the smell of sulhpur dioxide swept the mammoth hall as matches we ignited as a love offering.

He threw in some bravura guitar playing, on his knees on the floor and the ultimate over-head, behind-back, every possible angle. All this brought rauceous brayings for more, but I cut out before the last encore.

New York Times reviews the concert at Madison Square Garden

Garden Resound to Johnny Winter and Chicago

Johnny Winter and the Jazz-rock group Chicago are comparative rarities on the New York rock scene, Chicago plays here only once a year, and Winter has not appeared in the city for several years. Madison Square Garden played host to both of them last week. Winter, who appeared Saturday, remains, despite his absence, one of the more bizarre elements of rock in an industry not noted for visual rectitude. An albino guitarist-singer, he stalked onstage in a full-length black gown, Walt Disney's Wicked Witch come to play, guitar replacing broom-stick. The audience welcomed him ecstatically, although he stopped the show at one time to chastise it for throwing some lethal love offerings at him.

His litany is rock 'n' roll—the phrase crops up in all his songs and his announcements. Again, audience response to this over-kill of expression was baying enthusiasm. Winter still works his blues-leaning guitar into sheets of sound, involving the smears and slurs that made the instrumental rock of the late nine-teen-sixties so distinctive. That was also the time of Winter's arrival as a rock artist. He now works with two drummers, a bass player (with whom he did much full frontal rubbing—a concession perhaps to the currently trendy theater-rock) and a woman tambourinist. In view of the World Trade Center-size amplification that Winter carries, the tambourine rattling was a little ineffectual, but maybe it gives him comfort.

Winter has lost none of his raunch-rock power or glamour. Perhaps his marathon guitar solos sound similar at the end of the evening but it was a sustained show and an impres-sive return. On the bill, Foghat maintained its promise and Rocky Hill's rock sounded very promising. The crowd for Chicago on Thursday was much less raunchy in appreciation than Winter's audience. But then Chicago is much less raunchy in its approach, being among the more sophisticated of groups. It is a band conscious of presentation—everything is kept tight, controlled and arranged. Very professional. The program mixed old with new and all sounded familiar because Chicago is a band with definite identity, sound and style.

The obsessive chanting of "We can make it happen" in one composition recalled the innocence of yesteryear, the Woodstock Age. But maybe the very new "Feelin' Stronger Every Day" was more accurate. Bruce Springsteen, a performer who is both Dylanesque and punk rock, opened the concert. IAN DOVE


17 June 1973 Nassau Colosseum, Long Island

22 June 1973 New York Times

Ian Dove and Steve Paul comment on the throwing of objects during live concerts

Fireworks by Fan

By IAN DOVE

Johnny Winter stopped his Madison Square Garden show last Saturday to upbraid the audience for throwing things at him - cardboard hotdog holders, items of clothing and the like. Alice Cooper was hit and hurt at his Garden concert by a neatly aimed love token from the audience. Led Zeppelin (which winds up its current tour with three dates at the Garden next month)stopped its show at Tampa, Fla., because identified flying objects got in the way of the real action-the music.

Steve Paul, manager of Johnny Winter, call all the flying debris "an emotional release for the kids." Shep Gordon, Alice Cooper's manager, says: "In a sense, it's part of the show." Neither likes it at all because it makes the artists very vulnerable to damage.

Gordon admits that Cooper had "blood drawn" during a ball-park concert, and Paul worries about the fireworks let off inside the Garden on
Saturday (probably a seasonal phenomenon so close to July 4) and the possibility of short circuits and fire in the amplification equipment.

Both managers are reluctant to speak out about this unruly form of fan behavior because they fear that publicity will promote escalation. "Like skyjacking," says Paul.

Winter freaks are apparently the most varied in their airborne appreciation. Paul reports that postconcert litter includes flowers, hats, blouses, shirts - "favored articles of clothing," he comments-letters and messages. Cooper people prefer just jewelry, paper airplanes "and the occasional bottle," says Gordon.

Gordon has toyed with the idea of a really elevated stage so that any missiles would be "low intensity" by the time they reached the group, and even a plastic dome covering the stage. "But then it would no longer be live entertainment," he says. "And that's what the excitement at a rock concert is all about."

Artists such as Tom Jones and Engelbert Humperdinck, who sing in more restrained environments, are also exposed to low-level bombing. In their cases, it is more intimate 'items of female apparel and hotel keys. Melanie, on the other hand, gets the audience thrown at her. Invariably at the end of her concert, like lemmings, they will troop silently on stage, holding lighted candles, to sit surrounding their guru.


Another review of Johnny Winter at the Madison Square Garden

JOHNNY WINTER NEW YORK: Johnny Winter Is all that the American rock fan needs for an evening's entertainment. Johnny and a pack of beer, an opportunity to shake and shout, wave arms in the end and finish the evening by throwing the empty beer cans through a window. Winter is the king of the boogie merchants; flash but not too flash, loud but not complex. intricate but never above the fans' heads. A perfect combination of talent and ability to judge what the audience wants to hear. In his way, Johnny Winter is to America what Slade are to England in this respect.

Both acts are acutely aware of what to give their audience. Winter played a packed Madison Square Garden rec. ently. The orchestra level patrons were out of their seats for the whole show and the crush at the front looked less than comfortable. It was up, up, up all the way: rock roll from start to finish punctuated only by Johnny's sorties towards the mike between songs and hoarse shouts along the lines of "Do yer wanna rock 'n' roll?" Unanimous "yeahs" inevitably bounced back. most of his material was taken from the new "Saints and Sinners " album.

The last time I saw Winter, the band I was just three musicians. This time he's added an extra guitar player which filled out the sound even more and. thankfully, rang the changes a little from number to number. A little variation has added considerably more colour to the band, even though the relentless boogie became a little wearying after an hour. There were times when you could walk outside for 20 minutes and return, convinced that the band was playing the same number. It must have been frustrating for the performer that this particular part of the show seemed lost on the crowd who continued to yell for more "boogies."

Some fans even chucked beer cans and the like on stage causing Winter to interrupt the proceedings with a warning that any more missiles and he would end the show there and then. It stopped —although it didn't stop other factions inside the Garden from chucking lighted fireworks from the upper levels of this cavernous structure. Winter's decided he's there to entertain rather than educate. The audience, which included brother Edgar sat at the side of the stage, loved every move he made. — CHRIS CHARLESWORTH.

28 June 1973 Village Voice

A poster ad of Johnny Winter thanking for a sold out Madison

Unknown Venue - New York - 1973

The band is the Still Alive And Well formation. White Firebird used on all songs. Except for the intro song (Rock and Roll Hoochie Koo) where we notice a not-warmed-yet Johnny (I mean cliches riff), all the other songs are involve great solos (really inspired).

This was presented on our MTV-like broadcast network named Musique Plus

    Setlist:
  • Rock'n'Roll Hoochie Koo
  • Stone County
  • Jumping Jack Flash
  • Johnny B.Goode
  • Silver Train
 

Circus, Jun 1973

Review of "Still Alive and Well".

NME (New Musical Express 30 Jun 1973

Alive and well, but still working at high temperature!

YES, FOLKS, Johnny Winter is still alive and well, and he proved his recuperative abilities by selling out Madison Square Garden and thoroughly galvanising the crowd -despite the fact that while people kept yelling for "'rock and roll" Winter just kept on laying down his own brand of bluesy rock (which to me is near-er rock than blues any-way).

Bearsville recording artists Foghat were the opening act, and they got off a truly flash variation of British hot rocks. They seem to be just what New Yorkers expect a British act to be with silver suits, striped and checkered satin, endless energy output et al. Foghal's music roared outlandishly, stimulating the kids in the front rows to rise en masse, and trip the light fantastic.

The band have been building a following here, so several of their numbers were known-particularly "She's Gone." from their second album. and "Leaving Again"', from their first. During the set-up for Winter, Focus's "Hocus Pocus" was played, while promoter Howard Stein implored the kids to stay in their places and gel out of the stage area. It had all the makings of another Altamount, but thank God, didn't get out of hand. Winter won over the crowd immediately when he swept onto the stage in the same black velvet gown with shocking pink satin sleeves that he wore when he sat in at Max's Kansas City with Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys, and went "Nashville".

But there was nothing Country about his music, no sirree. "Still Alive And Well," Johnny's fifth Columbia album, does' contain one ripping L.A. Country-type song, "Ain't Nothing To Me," written by The Coasters in 1963. But whereas on the album Rick Derringer played pedal steel and slide guitar, there wasn't anything resembling a pedal steel on the Garden stage. They opened with Bill Broonzy and Arthur Crudup's "Rock Me Baby" from the new album, and a shower of silver squares cascaded down from the Garden ceiling -just like Alice Cooper's funny money did.

Sashaying across the stage with the lights turning his hair bright gold and his black gown fluttering. Winter looked like a witch riding a magic guitar. And with him was this Female beating on a tambourine with a stick -and she wore this fantastic silver jumpsuit which plunged to the navel -and lower -with multifringe, like a bopping neon cheerleader. Johnny capered up the scales of his guitar as though he had the mid-night creep. He stripped cutely out of his gown down to the samc kind of jump suit as the tambourine lady-bumping and grinding with purpose as he did so, to delighted applause.

Johnny's own "Rock And Roll", also from the new LP followed, and then "Rock And Roll Hoochie Koo," written by Derringer (who was not on the Garden gig).

He twirled his fringe like an exotic dancer, extricating his guitar strap, and working the stage. You could call him a perfectionist, but even the search for perfection has its limits. He changed his guitar in just about every song, and once, he even did it in the middle of a number. Someone in the audience threw something which hit him, and he stopped, mid-song, to lecture them:

"Next time someone hits me on the head, that's the end of the show!" He wasn't hurt, but he sure made an issue out of the action.

(When you think about Alice the Coop getting beaned by that tequila bottle and stillcarrying out his act -even with what turned out to be a minor concussion, you have to give credit where it's due. Alice is a trouper, whereas perhaps Johnny Winter has become more of an institution than a performer).

Every other word out of his mouth was "Rock and roll!", from his lyrics to his one-liners or more extended raps. Still, although he pretended to go along with the great Boogie Rock mystique, Johnny's music was not so much rock as the song titles suggested. His guitar style has lost none of its forcefulness, and my ears crackled from the decibel level. He played opposite his bass player, Randy Jo Hobbs,once of the McCoys, and also a member of the Johnny Winter And band.

The long, exaggerated solos were self-indulgent, although technically clean and gilt-edged. Imagine B. B. King at speed, dressed up like a witch doing a strip act, and you've got the picture. "Jumpin' Jack Flash" finally brought things round to rock, and it was about time. The folks wanted another chance to leap up and release their energy, and they seem to get to it no matter who performs this great rock classic. Johnny had'em going and reached for more, thrusting the head of his guitar between the legs of the tambourine-playing Sex Object. There was no way he could escape without doing several encores, and the smell of sulpphur dioxide swept the mammoth hall as matches were ignited as a love offering.

Kids on the balconies beseiged the lower areas with roman candles and other quickie flame-like devices, and the rent-a-cops started hustling and hassling.

After some deliberation (which was probably faked, since Johnny seemed be have calculated nearly every move), they chose Chuck Berry's "Johnny B. Goode", with all the stops pulled out. This inspired contributions on the chorus of "Go, Johnny. Go!" from the madding throng.

I'll still take Chuck Berry doing Chuck Berry. He threw in some bravura guitar playing, on his knees on the floor, and then the ultimat over-head, behind-back; every possible angle.

Visions of Hendrix were unavoidable, but Hendrix copped the idea from T-Bone Walker, who originated the practise of grinding the guitar suggestively between his legs or playing behind his back in the '40's. All this brought raucous brayings for more, but I cut out before the last encore.

 

Creem, Jul 1973

Johnny Winter on the front cover of CREEM July 1973, Titled: Back and Kicking

Johnny Winter Creem 1973 Johnny Winter Creem 1973

The Midnight Special Show - Friday 6 July 1973

Johnny Winter had TWO drummers on stage and a nice looking lady (Susan) playing tamborine on stage with him. He and the girl were wearing these really wild outfits: white leather overalls with metal studs and cutouts on the sides. Songs included: "Rock and Roll" off of "Still Alive and Well" and "Let it Bleed".

August 1973 Orphanage Albino Kangaroo

Johnny Winter plays with Peter Kaukonen and Jimmy Gille in a short-lived band Albino Kangaroo

Review of a flash concert in San Francisco from New Musical Express September 15, 1973

 

IT WAS a swell idea Johnny Winter had, the kind that restores-faith to the true believers: just tour out to San Francisco in his new mobile home and 'play unannounced sets at The Orphanage and The Keystone Berkeley, snug venues by any standards. The Beaumont Ace was here a few months back for a packed-house concert at Winterland, reeling and charging the stage lacy-white leather as part of his 'I've been burnt out but I made it through alive,'- comeback tour. _ It was one of those overstated displays that bring on `Judy Garland at Carnegie Hall' vibes; some obligatory showbiz.

These latest sets were to be another item altogether. Having paid his dues on the cavernous hall circuit, Johnny wanted to return to play with some local friends at clubs that would just accommodate Winterland's backstage crowd. Winter got in touch with Peter Kaukonen (brother to Jorma) and lead guitarist with the now-defunct Black Kangaroo, -to play bass, and brought Richard Hughes, from the last J. Winter disc — "Still Alive And Well," — with him to drum. They dubbed the group Albino Kangaroo and agreed to forego publicity for the gigs.

Both club owners apparently had other ideas, and after word got out, and the Keystone's owner bumped up his price Winter was quite angry. "I told the owner, 'you've ripped us off and the people who paid to see us, and I don't like you but we'll play anyway." Johnny explained: came to San Francisco because there are a lot of small clubs around that we could play in, but so far people have just taken advantage of us: See, people come in and have to pay 4.00 dollars and then they think its me that's makin' them pay it, and I don't want that. "I wanted it so the band didn't have to be great. Clubs can be a lot of fun because I can get better communication with the audience and people pay less. "At concerts and rock-n-roll shows people don't come for the music. I've tried it both ways — playing well, and jumpin around, and people always seem to like me best when I'm jumpin' around. "That's why I wanted to play some clubs — I didn't want to have to jump around ".

The Orphanage show was mighty fine, though. Despite the late publicity, the club was just comfortably filled when The Group appeared at a late 11.30 p.m., Winter looking faintly comic in an all black suit and circus-barker top hat, his platinum sheaf of hair running off his shoulders, sporting a whispy moustache and beard. - Kaukonen's solid bass, and Hughe's clean percussion soon had Winter loosening into the soaring fluid riffs which , brought him from backwoods Texan obscurity to international pop star status in the flash of a six-figure contract.

As the group played, passers-by stopped in the street and a crowd gathered outside the window, surprised in an audial double-take by that speed and grace, issued from such unexpected quarters. Without any wall of amplifiers, it was just Johnny Winter doing what he knows best. The group played a solid hour-and-a-half, moving through "Jumpin Jack Flash", "Dust My Broom". It was a fine set, nothing you'd want to bootleg for the ultimate archieves, but with most flash concerts the irritating drag they are, it was a real treat to catch a talent like Winter in such comfortable surroundings, and, in the face of inconsiderate club-owners, I'd like to thank the old boy for the chance... '

KG KWOTE5

As you know there are a lot of good things going on: Top rock 'n roll-blues guitarist and singer Johnny Winter performed at a crowded Orphanage- last week. Whenever he hits the stage there is a special feeling in the air and the Orphange was no different except that he might have been better than normal. He was playing with Jorma Kaukonen's brother Peter, who was on bass and Jimmy Gillen on drums who was once with a band called Black Kangaroo. The name of their little trio was Albino Kangaroo. The purpose of all this was for Johnny to play some blues, which he did but because of the crowd's demand he did some of his old faithful stuff like "Jumping Jack Flash," "Rock 'n Roll Hoochie Koo" and a few things off his recent album

Rock, 27 Aug 1973

Cover: Johnny Winter

Sounds September 1973 (Germany)

Review of the album "Still Alive and Well"

Pop September 1973 (Germany)

JOHNNY UND EDGAR WINTER «Johnny Winter trieb ein bereitwilliges Publikum förmlich zu kompletter Kapitulation, als er seine schier betäubend-hinreissende Blues-Show im Fillmore East in New York abzog. Wie ein schockierendes Gespenst in platinblondem Haar springt und tobt er über die Bühne, während er seine Gitarrensaiten malträtiert und kämmt, mit kühnen Griffen und rasanten Läufen. Wenn Winter spielt, ist er der souveräne Herrscher auf der Szene. Das Publikum sitzt nur noch in stillem Einvernehmen im Saal und starrt förmlich auf den weiss-haarigen Magier, der ihm den Verstand mit seiner Musik raubt...»

 

So schrieb Ende 1969 ein Kritiker über den Blues-Gitarristen Johnny Winter, nachdem er ihn zum ersten Mal live auf der Bühne gesehen hatte. In diesem Zusammenhang er-wähnte er auch kurz den Bruder von Johnny - Edgar Winter - «der am elektrischen Klavier, Alto - Saxophon und am Schlagzeug bravourös mit seinem Bruder mithalte ...» Mit Frankenstein an die Spitze Heute hat Edgar Winter, der vor Jahren noch mit einem Satz neben Johnny Winter erwähnt wurde, seinen Bruder schon längst übertroffen. Er ist nicht mehr nur der kleinere Bruder des grossen Johnny Winter, sondern ein Musiker und Band-Leader, der absolut auf eigenen Beinen steht.

Dies bewies Edgar diesen Sommer, als er in Amerika mit seiner LP «They Only Come Out At Night» und dem daraus ausgekoppelten Instrumental-Titel «Frankenstein» während drei Wochen den ersten Platz der Hitparade halten konnte. Edgar bezeichnet diesen Erfolg nicht als Folge kommerzieller Musik, sondern aufgrund des etwas verrückten Themas «Vampire», das der ganzen Platte zugrunde liegt. «Wenn du heute etwas Ausgefreaktes machst, dann ist dir der Erfolg sicher», meint er bescheiden. Von harter Arbeit und Können redet er nicht ... Seit drei Jahren «on the road» Ende 1970 trennte sich Edgar Winter von seinem Bruder Johnny, weil sich ihre musikalischen Auffassungen in nichts mehr glichen.

Johnny kam zu-dem zusehends mehr auf den Drogentrip - schlussendlich landete er in einer Nervenheilanstalt zur Entziehungskur. Er brauchte über ein Jahr, um von der Fixe loszukommen. Während dieser Zeit reiste Edgar mit seiner eigenen Band «White Trash» in Amerika von Auf tritt zu Auftritt. Das Ganze gipfelte schlussendlich darin, dass aus dem einstigen Quintett «White Trash» eine Truppe von über 10 Musikern geworden war. Mit dem phantastischen Sänger Jerry LaCroix sowie den beiden ehemaligen Mitgliedern der McCoys («Hang On Sloopy»), Rick Derringer und Randy Hobbs, die zuvor mit Johnny in dessen Formation «And» zusammen waren, spielte die Gruppe um Edgar Winter das Live-Album «Roadwork» ein, das von der amerikanischen Fachzeitschrift «Biliboard» zum besten und swingensten Live-Album der letzten Jahre ernannt wur de.

Trotzdem blieben die Er-folge im grossen Stil aus. Des-halb entschloss sich Edgar, die Gruppe aufzulösen, um sich neuen Projekten zuzuwenden. Edgar: «White Trash war bis zum Schluss eine phantastische Sache. Doch jeder Auf-tritt war mehr und mehr so et-was wie eine gigantische Jam-Session, die zwar riesigen Spass machte, vom Kreativen her jedoch einiges vermissen liess». Die neue Formation, kurz «Edgar Winter Group» genannt, schaffte schliesslich den Durchbruch - aus Zufall. Man weiss, Frankenstein war schuld...

Johnny Winters Comeback Nachdem Johnny Winter aus der Nervenheilanstalt entlassen wurde - er hatte sich freiwillig einer Entziehungskur unterzogen, weil er von Heroin abhängig war (siehe POP Nr. 14172: «Johnny Winter - Ich war ein Fixer») - musste er sich in der Musik-Szene zuerst einmal wieder zurechtfinden. Seine über einjährige Abwesenheit hatte ihn ziemlich weltfremd gemacht. Die ersten musikalischen Gehversuche unternahm er in der Band seines Bruders, «White Trash». Er ist auch auf einigen Stücken der Live-LP «Roadwork» mit von der Partie. Dann erst gründete er wieder eine neue Formation, die diesmal ein Trio sein sollte. Mit dabei sind: sein alter Kumpel Randy Jo Hobbs (Bass), sowie der Schlagzeuger Richard Hughes.

Eine Überraschung bot der neue Johnny Winter trotzdem: aus dem ehemaligen Blueser war praktisch ein kompromissloser Rocker geworden. Ob-wohl er seine Musik schon seit der ersten LP, die noch reinen Delta-Blues beinhaltete, stetig mehr mit Rock bestückte, kam dieser musikalische Sinneswandel doch etwas plötzlich. Winter kann seine Bluesver gangenheit allerdings auch mit Rock'n'Roll nicht ganz vertuschen. «Still Alive And Well», wie der Titel der ersten LP nach seiner «Genesung» lautet, ist gar mit einem Mellotron angereichert, und die Herren Jagger/Richard von den Rolling Stones steuerten einen brandneuen Titel hinzu. «Alive» und «well» präsentiert sich Johnny Winter jetzt auch wise-der auf der Bühne. Er hat nichts von seiner alten Faszination verloren. Dies beweist auch die Tatsache, dass seine Konzerte in Amerika jeweils innert Stunden ausverkauft sind. Und dies schon einige Wochen vor dem Konzert

   

Song Hits magazine, Nov 1973

Song Hits magazine was a Charlton Publication. This issue, Volume 37 #93, was released in November 1973. Featured articles include: Johnny Winter, The Dramatics, and Don Gibson. The magazine includes the words to over 60 Pop tunes. These are in the Pop, Soul, and Country categories. Some listings are: Delta Dawn, The Long Way Home, Monster Mash, The Long Way Home, You Light Up My Life, The Hurt, You Can't Always Get What You Want,and Bad Weather.

Song Hits 1973

November 1973 InConcert

Johnny Winter is headlining the InConcert First Anrmersan, show a three-hour special to be aired 1130pm Friday.

Winter performs Rock and Roll Hoochie Koo Black Cat Bone Johnny B Goode
Jumpin Jack Flash and Silver Train " the latter from his current album "Still Alive And Well". His current trio includes Randy Jo Hobbs on Richard Hughes on Drus. The show consists of highlights from the first years InConcert that was taped at the Aquarium Theatre in Los Angeles before an audience of 1200 music and file celebrities.

InConcert First Anniversary is hosted by Dick Clark.

 

Johnny Winter in Sounds Magazine 1973

Sounds magazine, 8 December 1973

Junk and the Man Today

The Johnny Winter Story an exclusive two part. interview by Jerry Gilbert

Johnny Winter in Sounds Magazine 1973
Johnny Winter in Sounds Magazine 1973
Johnny Winter in Sounds Magazine 1973

 

11 December 1973 Arena

Johnny Winter will be performing 11 December 1973 at the Arena. Also on the bill will be Electric Light Orchestra , a group not to be taken lighty. On Monday Cheech and Chong will be at the Syria Mosque

 

Wed 19 December 1973 Municipal Auditorium, New Orleans, LA

Johnny Winter 19 December New Orleans
Johnny Winter 19 December New Orleans
 

Thursday 27 December 1973: Vets Memorial Auditorium, Des Moins: 1st Annual Holiday Rock and Roll Recital

Johnny Winter, The James Gang

 

Saturday 29 December 1973 Indianapolis Fairgrounds Coliseum, Featuring Johnny Winter, The New York Dolls, Spirit, Brownsville Station. In later announcements of this event, "The New York Dolls" were replaced by "The James Gang"

 

Warum Johnny Winter plotzlich auf den Blues pfeift

Johnny Winter Biography in German

Seit er denken kann, musiziert Johnny Winter. Und er denkt schon eine ganze Weile. Am 23. Februar 1944 wurde er in Beaumont (Texas) als Sohn musikalisch engagierter Eltern - der Vater spielte Saxophon, zupfte Banjo und sang in Kirchenchören, während Mama Winter dem Klavier zugetan war - geboren. Kaum verwunderlich, dass in diesem Milieu Johnnys Interesse wie. auch dasjenige seines Bruders Edgar schon früh auf Musik gelenkt wurde. Als die beiden Brüder noch zur Schule gingen, hatten sie bereits ihre erste Blues-Gruppe: "lt and Them".

Später änderten sie den Namen in Johnny Winter and the Black Plague um. Die Weichen stellten sich aber erst endgültig, als Johnny nach einem Semester am Technischen College Lamar Fersengeld gab und sich nach dem Blues-Mekka Chicago absetzte. Dort wollte er sich einmal richtig in die Blues-Materie vertiefen . -- Die «Vertiefung» dauerte nur einige Wochen. Nachdem er einige Male mit Leuten wie Mike Bloomfield und Barry Goldberg, damals selber noch unbeschriebene Blätter, gejammt hatte, zog es ihn wieder in den Süden hinunter. Sechs Jahre lang tingelte er dann durch die Lande.

In einem grossen Zigeunerwagen mit Kind, Weib und Gesang. Die Engagements, die er zusammen mit Bassist Tommy Shannon und Schlagzeuger John Turner erhielt, waren künstlerisch zumeist uninteressant, da das Publikum stets nur gerade die jeweils aktuelle Hitparade hören wollte. Aber wenigstens verliehen ihm die vielen Auftritte die Bühnengewandtheit, iie es nun einmal braucht, um vor kritischem Auditorium bestehen zu können. Johnny Winter startete in dieser entbehangsreichen Zeitspanne mehere Versuche, bei Plattenfirsten unterzukommen.

Meist gediehen derartige Bemühungen soweit, dass er zu Probe-aufnahmen ins Studio gebeten wurde, dort ein paar gängige Vummern aus seinem Bühnen repertoire vorspielen musste, md dann mit der Vertröstung (Interessant, was Wir werden uns melden. Worum Johnny Winter plötzlich auf den Blues pfeift ... sobald sich eine Möglichkeit ein Hitparaden-Barometer und bietet, eine Platte von Ihnen zu am Stimmungsbarometer in produzieren...» wieder Konzertsälen eindeutig schickt wurde. abzulesen gewesen war, dass 1968 wurde er dann das erste Johnny Winter zum erfolgs - Mal nicht fortgeschickt. Columbia Records (in Europa haben viele - ich schätze, es CBS) war fasziniert von diesem sind etwa vier oder fünf - Platschlohweisshaarigen Gitarristenfirmen, die früher mit Johnsten, der in einem Artikel fur Probeaufnahmen bewerk - Rock-Magazins Rolling Stone stelligt hatten, ihre Archive frenetisch gelobt und allein geplündert und im Vertrauen daraufhin ins Fillmore East auf die Dummheit des Volkes gagiert worden war. Johnny diese teilweise entsetzlich Winter wurde vom Fleck weg Aufnahmen als LPs veröfunter Vertrag genommen.

Und fentlicht. Ausserdem hat natürdas erst noch mit einer Start- lieh Johnny Winter nicht aufgage, die einmalig in der gehört, reguläre (und faire) schichte der Columbia war. Longplays zu bespielen. Nach Nur gerade Bob Dylan erhält seinem Columbia Debüt folgte heute mehr. Kaum war der ein Doppelalbum genannt Vertragsabschluss «Second Winter», dann die LP schäftskreisen publik geworden «Johnny Winter And» und just den, regte sich in Los Angeles letzthin die Platte «Live Johny Winter And" drüben die Plattenfirma Liberty Winter And».

und brachte eine LP namens die beiden letzteren «The Progressive Blues Experiment- leases unter die Lupe nimmt, Exoeriment erzeugt von einem wird feststellen, dass da Johnny gewissen Johnny Winter, her plötzlich nicht mehr - wie zu-aus. Das Musikband war der vor - dem Blues frönt. Sondern Firma von einem Schwarz- auf ihn pfeift. Und dafür harten händler zugespielt worden. Die Beat-Rock serviert, der ihm Platte, ein aggressiver Blues- übrigens wie angegossen steht Brocken mit Musik, wie sie Die Gründe für diesen Stil - bald einmal für Johnny Winter wechsel sind in etwa identisch typisch sein sollte, flitzte ohne mit jenen, die bisher noch je-grosse Umstände hitparaden- den grossen weissen Gitarriaufwärts.

Columbia ärgerte mit der Zeit bewogen grün und blau, hielt es eben, von Blues auf Rock umzudann aber doch für klüger, mit satteln. «Blues ist in seiner Art ihrem ersten Johnny-Winter- beschränkt. Und ich wollte Album etwas zuzuwarten, bis nicht jahraus, jahrein, dieselbe der Rummel um «Blues Experiment- Musik machen.» Um diesem Experiment» etwas abgeklungen Wunsche entsprechen zu könwar. Diese Taktik sollte sich , blieb Johnny nichts anderichtig erweisen, indem übrig, als seine bisherigen lieh ein halbes Jahr später die Begleitmusiker John und CBS-LP den Liberty-«Zögling» Tommy («Als Typen sind sie verkaufsmässig mühelos über prima. Aber sie kommen vom fiügelte... Blues nicht los. Es ging einfach Heute, zwei Jahre nachher, nicht mehr weiter») auszuhat Johnny Winter bereits an wechseln.

Und zwar gegen die LPs auf dem Markt. Wie Rick Derringer (Gitarre), Ran-kommt das, wird sich jeder zu Randy Jo Hobbs (Bass) und Randy Recht - fragen. Nun,nachdem Z (Schlagzeug), die vorher zusammen die Rock-Format McCoys (Hang On Sloopy gebildet hatten. «Ich brauch ein paar Leute, die mich erzen und die vor allem sind», begründet Johnny s Wahl. «Die Ex-McCoys sin d genau richtig.» So richtig sie bisher indessen wieder nicht Zumindest nicht, nämlich Randy Z. Drummer erlitt infolge zu tensiven Drogengenus einen leichteren Wahnsinns fall und musste ins Spital bracht werden. Seither trommelt Bobby Caldwell für ihn.

Zusammengefasst lässt es sagen: Der Wechsel von BIues zu Rock bricht Guitar-Kö nig Johnny Winter keine Zahn aus der Krone. Im Gegenteil Der diesjährige Sommer wahrscheinlich sogar mehr Zeichen des (Johnny) Winter stehen, denn je ein Sommer
und ein Winter zuvor.

 

 

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