The Johnny Winter Story

Johnny Winter's Let Me In

Johnny Winter's Let Me In

Johnny Winter's Let Me In

Johnny Winter's Let Me In

"Let Me In" is the first album of Johnny Winter after he switches from MCA to Pointblank records. The music on this album lets Johnny return to rootsier blues.

 

 

Johnny Winter

Down Beat (9/92, p.39) - 4 Stars - Very Good - "...What's most impressive about LET ME IN is the variety of emotional and musical textures Winter can summon with the constraints of his primarily balls-out style... The Mad Albino is still at the top of his game..."

CD Review September 1992 Volume IX, Number 1

Johnny Winter: Let Me In Pointblank/Charisma 91744-2 1991 4 / 5 Stars
For more than 20 years, Johnny Winter has fueled his Texas-bent brand of blues/rock with rapid-fire guitar solos and coarse vocals. The high octane combination has kept the motor to his hybrid music machine running through good times and bad. Thus, it comes as no surprise that Winter's first album in more than three years (and his debut album for Charisma's Pointblank blues label) roars with the same guitar/vocal energy of the best of Winter's previous studio efforts.

What makes Let Me In fare better than its predecessor, the disappointing Winter of '88, is the material and the clever production strategy devised by Winter and Dick Shurman. Smartly selected songs such as "Illustrated Man" (a dandy of a rocker that deals with Winter's tattoo fetish), the rather hectic "Hey You" (with its surprise ending), "Sugaree" (an old Marty Robbins number that's been reworked from top to bottom with a hard driving rock'n'roll rhythm) not only gring out the best of Winter's guitar playing, but also exhibit a noticeably relaxed confidence and sense of flow.

Shurman and Winter also have fun on the title track, an acoustic Delta blues ditty written by Winter, and "Medecine Man," a tune that would have sounded at home on the classic Second Winter album of two decades ago. The song's slow yet biting groove and tightly controlled guitar solo are in marked contrast to the more rollicking tracks on the disc.
All of this is to say that there's plenty to enjoy on Let Me In. With a sound that's bold and bright to complement the strong material, Let Me In ought to keep Johnny Winter at the forefront of the blues/rock scene.

- Robert Santelli

AUDIO 9/91:
Powerful blues alternate with beautiful ballads and give so a work without weak moments.

ROLLING STONE ALBUM GUIDE: ***1/2 ...he doesn't really get his mojo working again until 'Let Me In'. Cranking up his National Steel guitar, covering forebears like T-Bone Walker and Jimmy Reed, Winter comes close to rocking that door off its hinges.

All Music Guide , Volume: 1 , # 1
by Ron Wynn
Rated: 1

While "Let Me In" isn't perfect, there is enough thoughtful, expressive singing and tingling guitar solos to set it apart from almost all his other major label projects. The presence of a number of blues and rock luminaries, particularly Albert Collins, doesn't hurt anything either.

Johnny Winter's Let Me In Johnny Winter's Let Me In

POINTBLANK #86244
Johnny Winter's Let Me In

Also available on Charisma
Release date: 08 Jun 1991
Producer: Dick Shurman, Johnny Winter
Engineer: Davix Axelbaum

 

    Tracklisting of "Let Me In"
  1. ILLUSTRATED MAN
  2. BAREFOOTIN'
  3. LIFE IS HARD
  4. HEY YOU
  5. BLUE MOOD
  6. SUGAREE
  7. MEDICINE MAN
  8. YOU'RE HUMBUGGING ME
  9. IF YOU GOT A GOOD WOMAN
  10. GOT TO FIND MY BABY
  11. SHAME SHAME SHAME
  12. LET ME IN
  13. YOU LIE TOO MUCH

 Guitar World 1991, reviews the album "Let me in" by Bill Milkowski

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